9 Responses to “Raising three good kids.”

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  1. Hadley lewno

    Why am I tearing up reading this? Maybe because I think about this all the time too. Great reminder that us moms are not in this alone! And I think, just the fact that we care about it and are talking about it, is a good sign for the future :-) sending your family love!

  2. I am feeling so much of the same right now, especially as R is getting older and … sassier! I am sometimes shocked with the things he says or tone of voice he uses and other times I am so proud of how kind and patient he is with his brother. I think I am not as consistent as I should be either, it is hard! But I also think the lessons are sinking in and hopefully will be displayed one day

  3. Heather

    I am feeling so much of the same right now, especially as R is getting older and … sassier! I am sometimes shocked with the things he says or tone of voice he uses and other times I am so proud of how kind and patient he is with his brother. The whining is also a huge problem right now. I think I am not as consistent as I should be either, it is hard! But I also think the lessons are sinking in and hopefully will be displayed one day.

    Also … the part about the basement while you cook. Is that bad? LOL

  4. Mariah de Guardia

    I think about this all the time… i want my girls to be really good people; happy, fulfilled, caring and polite. I want them to respect themselves and others. It’s such a challenge! Are we doing a great job… i think we have to wait another 12-18 years to know for sure… but as long as there is a lot of love, as much patience as we can muster, and consistency… well i don’t think we cam do much more than that. Above all else we have to teach the good stuff, and repeat ourselves a million times till it becomes ingrained in them… be nice, be polite, be compassionate, be honest, be forgiving, be kind, be gentle, etc. All we can do is our best… and soemd as much time as we can enjoying the journey of Mommy-hood!

  5. Oh this is so true and something I think all parents worry about! I struggle with the inconsistency as well but I find that things run so much smoother when I talk and remind the girls beforehand what is expected and to mind their manners.
    Like when we go to a birthday party at the trampoline park I will tell my 5 YO, “Okay, we are about to head in. We’re bringing the present up and I want you to tell Landon’s parents hello and put the present up before running down to jump. Also, there are big and little kids here so you need to stay away from where the babies are jumping since you are a big girl. And since Landon goes to school somewhere else, there may be some kids you don’t know but be kind to everyone and be an include.”
    It’s not always perfect but I feel kids still need a reminder on how to act!
    Just the fact that you are thinking about it makes you a great mommy:)

  6. Amanda

    It seems, just from reading your tiny window-into-your-world blog, you do value academic advancement a great deal. Understandable sentiment, to a certain degree; it’s certainly brag-worthy and self-fulfilling to have a kid who’s ‘ahead’. I also think our kids can sense what’s important to us and what’s on the back burner so if the gentle advice from a random internet stranger who’s just a bit further down the parenting path is welcomed, here goes: show them, not just TELL them, what you value. If early reading is your priority, you’re going to have to accept that perhaps other life skills are going to fall by the wayside. What’s more important long-term? Reading at 4 or kindness and polite empathy? (That’s absolutely not a snarky question? YMMV, truly.)

  7. Anna

    This is the definition of a humble brag. It’s actually hard to read, and tough to stomach. “My kids are academically gifted and I’m such fun mom…blah blah…I worry they are not kind…but let me list 15 specific examples of them being kind so everyone knows they’re kind.” I hope you have some down to earth friends that are telling you to get a grip. I miss your posts from before, when you were funny and real. What a shame. Even your Instagram posts are humble brags (or just flat out brags). It’s. Too. Much.

    • RhodeyGirlTests

      Hi Anna, I do post a lot of real life stuff to Instagram, but I always delete those posts within a day or two. I don’t want my kids to scroll through my Instagram one day and see that I was complaining about them or asking for advice about their misbehavior. I also use Instagram as a way to share my life with my huge family that lives overseas. My husband is gone for 12+ hours a day and it’s also how he gets his fix of the kids.

      This post is another example. I am aware of my social media presence, and with my kids getting older they may soon be able to search for my name and find this website. I don’t want them to think I think they are bad kids because I don’t. I have a lot of challenges as a mom, and in this post I share a feeling I feel a lot of the time – that I’m failing them. They ARE academically advanced, and I have no problem saying that. Their manners can SUCK, and I have no problem saying that either. Both, to be honest, can be burdens. I’m pregnant with my fourth and having a really hard time but I prefer to try and keep that off the internet as much as I can. That’s part of the reason I blog so, so much less now. I want to keep some parts of my life private and prefer to focus on the positive if I can in public.

      Your comment definitely hit a sore spot for me and I appreciate your honesty. I will be more aware of how I come off and will do my best not to humble brag. Thanks for your honesty.

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